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answer the 1% question. what tax rate would you be willing to be taxed at if people at that level are all taxed at a rate? >> i would go back to the eisenhower rate. you know what eisenhower was taxing people out? 70% to 90%. you want to go back to a rate where there is a supertax on the very rich and millionaires. you want to get rid of the loopholes. look at the capital gains tax of 15%. we are taxing work the barely taxing wealth region but barely tax and wealth. that is the wrong priority. -- we're taxing work but barely taxing wealth. the robin hood taxes an idea whose time has come. radicals light nicholke nicolasy and angela merkel have a tax on currency transactions that would bring in $350 billion a year. some of my heroes are the nurses of this country. national nurses united heal america. tax-loss >>> there are a slew -- tax on wall street. there are a slew of good things that 1%ers are for. >> he is not really offering of a lot. >> he is talking about being taxed less than his assistant. there is a group of patriotic millionaires. it is the belief that you owe backe to
by the state was a potential death now for the housing and our taxes stopped the growth of our economy. we in this room and many of us working together took on the story changes for our city some of which have vexed for years >> years. i'm proud that together we through innovation and we foerjd our way ahead. to the city commissioners and to the department heads and to our friends in the business, labor you think non-profit and other communities who spent countless hours with us in negotiations and to the great people of san francisco who rewarded us with your support at ballet in san francisco thank you, very much. together we're putting san francisco back on the right track and building a solid foundation for all our residents. my fellow san francisco's we're living in a time of astonishing innovation and unlimited process we're driving that innovation and for or against the future right here right now not just for san francisco but for the whole world. within the lab of our technologies we're developing techniques will will save lives. to our market district we're providing the world w
a tax shillings to the pound. another indicate the tax is paid and another indicate the taxes in arrears. james lacy was paid in full and not in a rears. the tax in 1846 was cut in half from the previous year. the year 1847 shows something else. the people were taxed in may of 1847 and made to pay a 4 fold increase and in october of 1847, 15 times what they were paying in 1846. this amounted to a 900 percent increase in tax in less than a year. still james lacy was paid in full and not in arrears. i show the book to the librarian who knows i am reading papers to look for clearance notices and says, there's your answer now you know why they left. newspaper mentioned the establishment of insolvant commission. in commission states the tax afforded the clearance amongers the most effective means of getting rid of this agricultural population. some landlords were praised as humane for forgiving 3-4 year's rent or accepting what people could pay. these landlords were in the minority and the landlord of cottage where nie family lived was not among them. rate payer books for 1848 is missing. the
. can you talk about the payroll tax issue and how it is helping san francisco in the region? >> thank you, james, for the question. let me say i am happy to be here in silicon valley. i know the relationship with san francisco, the valley, san jose, is extremely important. i wanted to be down here to join these electors panel of guests as well. the payroll tax in san francisco had been one -- i was here about a year ago explaining twitter. as everybody knows, they were not only threatening, they were planning to leave the city of san francisco. they had already identified a building. they said, we are about to grow to about 2000 employees and we are quick to get taxed for that. we think that is not going to be our business model. so we fought through it, david chiu, jane kim and i, we started to discuss with them, met with them. the key thing was job growth for our city, coming out of the economic challenges. so we started a good conversation, started the central market tax exemption. we got something out of it, which was to potentially relocate. they responded by signing the lease an
a huge champion in you as we look at tax reform, we're confident that you will be with us on that issue. we get investors to buy the tax credits and that helps to pay for the building. it's a very complicated transaction and todd is here representing the foundation. they have brought in equity investment of over $1.2 billion. to give you a sense of how important they are and how important the program is. thank you. [ applause ] you know in san francisco, everything is green, but liz helps us go greener. and so they have provided an important pre-development grant to help us understand how to green this project and make them the most environmentally sustainability program. they are a huge partner with us nationally and with all the communities and the work that they do across the country. so thank you stephanie and liz. [ applause ] we have two different banking partners on this project that have combined to lend over $22 million to the construction loan on this project. citibank and silicon valley bank. merl is around. former mercy employee, also wonderful human being. merl is also h
for lower middle class and middle-class people, people who are working and paying taxes. we need to have them here for a functioning economy. i am looking for ways to fund more of that kind of housing, particularly for a central employees like teachers, nurses, first responders. we need to make sure that our development is a transit- oriented. we do not want to encourage suburban sprawl. we want to do infill housing so that people can live near where they work and near public transportation. >> let's talk about public transportation. is there adequate muni service in your district? what is the parking and traffic situation like? >> muni is not near where it needs to be. in the caster, we have the subway. -- in the castro, we have the subway. a can be terrific or frustrating. we are next to the bart line. in other parts of the district, is unreliable. the writeridership is lower bece of unreliability. other lines are not as frequent and people not think of using them. we have a particular problem in diamond heights. the neighborhood is served primarily by the 52 line. it is incredibly unr
-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so that every year we're repairing, replacing the right things, and we don't have to do it all at once, which is,
be a 1% with the 99%. those you call out and hold accountable are those who want to cut taxes for the rich and no fair share who want to live in the privatized environment and not care about the civic situation. that is truly damaging to the possibility of already beleaguered ideals. nothing is simple. i cover the former soviet union and russia. i could go on at great length about how boris yeltsin undermined democracy and became a hero democracy. lech walnsa in many ways was not the. working bloke many made him not to be. gorbachev was a visionary who came to power. he saw he needed to change the country. he used his powers to do that. he withdrew from afghanistan. he called for nuclear abolition. he worked with ronald reagan. he understood you need political solutions, not military solutions. when the soviet troops were ready to come out of the barracks so the berlin wall would not come down, he told them to stay in the barracks, the empire is going. we cannot be a country that will be one of glasnost and perestroika if we live the way we have. it is the 20th anniversary of
of the things that we were determined to protect in that debate was the new markets tax credit, something that has benefited some of these kinds of initiatives throughout the country. so whether it was long ago and the low-income housing tax credit of which mercy housing has participated in over and over again and the new market tax credit, one of the current versions of the story. or the section 8 vouchers or the rest of that, public policy has played a role. but we can only be successful in achieving the funding for that public policy if we have examples of national significance to say this must be a priority. and it is a priority because mercy housing and st. anthony's makes people the priority. results. deeds, not just words. the words are important, but they are no substitute for making something happen from it. we all know the gospel of matthew and i was hungry, you gave me to eat and that is what st. anthony's has done. when you were homeless, you gave me shelter and that is mercy housing and they have come together. it's not just about food and housing, but it's about dignity and
.c., that would strengthen the innovation economy? >> i could go on about immigration and corporate tax policy reform, but i am a researcher, so i will not. >> and we have seven minutes. >> mayor lee said it perfectly. the fundamental thing that companies are looking for is to be engaged in the process. we use a term in computing called agile. we look for more ability and the possibility to work with us, iterate in the process, rather than what we often see as we call the waterfall, take-it-or- leave-it. flexibility and agility is what is most important. >> mayor lee? >> i have always thought of our city as being the gateway to the rest of the world. i have often talked, with companies, i want to be with you when you turn the corner. we want to be the city that treats international markets for your products. i do not know if you know this but we have 70 counsel general offices in san francisco, the highest number outside of washington, d.c. we want to make sure that our companies know we are not just in it for san francisco, the region. we have to tap international markets. they love hearing t
proposed that this year we look at the transportation system in our city with pay role tax reform. in a nutshell we got all the leaders together in our city and agreed to make a difference. i say let's take that same approach with our transportation challenges too. we already have a lot of plans and reports that all driveway solutions were we need to more than news to better match up with the 21 accounting century where people work and shop. and so we'll have a transportation 200 thirty transportation workforce. we'll be working with our controllers office, we'll invite all our heeds from regional transportation system and our technology community to the table. i'm also thankful that commissioner wen eras agreed to meet with us on this opportunity. we'll maintain the condition of our streets and we'll make municipal transportation systems in this city work the way they want to work. don't get close to our municipal syst system that some folks may say. we cannot let politics be our guide. paris london and england has great transportation systems but look at san francisco. achieving
-income housing tax credits which are critical for the financing of this development, and all the other affordable housing developments in san francisco. so, again, we want to acknowledge the -- her leadership and her contribution and her support throughout her very long career for affordable housing in san francisco. at this time i'd like to introduce the president of the tenants association, diva youngblood. and one of the things that we wanted to do in this, you know, as part of hope sf, was this was doing -- building affordable housing, not for the residents, but with the residents. and we really tried very, very hard to consult the residents in the development process. it helped with resident associations as we developed the hope sf concept. i see dwayne jones. i don't know if fred is anywhere here, but dwayne and fred and doug and matt franklin really sought to solicit a lot of input from the residents because the goal of this -- of building housing is not to, again, not to just build it for the residents, but build it with the residents and build communities. and ensure that the residents h
taking office. it benefits us the truth about $55 million in tax revenue. nightlife is the only significant industry in this city that sometimes gets treated at times as it is a nuisance, a problem to be managed. and of course, we have to focus on making sure it is safe and that people are complying with the laws and that we are not having shooting. but when you get so focused on combating the negatives -- every industry has the negatives. you can sometimes lose sight of the positives and we know there are a huge positives for nightlife in the city. we know that a lot of our street shares are at risk -- street fairs are at risk of being given fees to death. we have completely outdated the planning commission like that mission how are used district, which makes it extremely hard to do anything alcohol related in a big swath of the mission. there was a bowling alley that wanted to go in at 17th and van ness and they were not going to be able to do it because they would have been banned from even selling beer. that is the tip of the iceberg in terms of planning provisions that make
. i do not know what else to do besides try to make a profit in a city that is over-taxing the and running down. [applause] >> i do think that you can do a lot through talking to your city supervisor and working through that process. i am telling you, there are ways that began help you. alcohol is a local issue on this type of matter. what we are behind would you guys want to do, whenever that is. a lot of times we do not always have statutes that make that much sense. it is partly the ways that the laws have evolved and we are the ones who are stuck with enforcing them the way that they are. that does not necessarily mean that we think they are particularly good ideas, but we certainly want people to grow, prosper, and be saved. that can be achieved in all sorts of ways. we want to work with you on that. thank you. >> i was the founding president of the entertainment commission. i retired and went on to found the culture association, the first trade association statewide for night life, bar, and restaurant activities. i am here with a question that plagues a lot of these l
these specimens saved. i go to a tax dermist shop when the man gives a look of hear when i pull out the ear shells. he refused to do it. i return it later and unmake his look say, i will never do it again your ear shells forgotten in the trash bin of the polytechnic where i toss them of history. days later i'm convinced i see one hand carried by a rat. seeking the traces of your body and the animals is this not a form of transcendence my darling. a downward rising the maggets small white gods like an animal mob. you did not answer my question with the language we used between us you vomited and stared into the lenses i wore to cover my pupils to keep some things in and some things out plastic screens. was it not possible to make love in that space. i could save you and i do make an essay and listened and obeyed. i hoped to carry your ear shell with me. i read the manual from beginning to end a manual for the master's and the slaves much the master hates the slave. not the [inaudible] we would like your spirit. it is what we seek in the dark pits of the capital. what else could be accomplished or d
and it was the wrong target. you spend $3 trillion on the budget and tax cut for the wealthiest americans and took their money to the camen islands and not in america and having huge threats and medicaid and medicare and threaten the scpeerns that is violence. number one and must commit ourselves to the ban on assault weapons. we lost about 6,000 americans in iraq in 10 years. lose 30 to 50,000 a home at home. 100,000 are injured and didn't die and the highest cost in any city is the emergency room hospitals in those cities where they're shot. [inaudible] shot by ak47's. we have a lot of role in the killing of syria. 9/11 /12 in benghazi. [inaudible] yards away. we must revive the ban on these adult suspects. i don't want to. >> >> >> deemphasize the drug culture and americans and so we have this crisis mr. mayor of plants closing when the cheap labor markets, jobs leaving, drugs and guns coming. that requires a national effort by all of us. while i reach out to you in san francisco those that hear my voice please stop the killing. please stop drug flow. please give peace a chance. in thi
been closed. $1.6 million in tax. we have been the envy of the world as to our justice system. as the world becomes smaller and as multinational corporations decide where they will invest their money, they have historically invested it in the united states because we have had a court system that has been the envy of the world, but they won't continue to do that if they cannot get justice in america. there is an economic reason as well as a moral reason to make sure that our courts are open. we have a crisis in our federal system. 92 vacancies exist today in the federal court system. 15% of our federal court is vacant. we have 26 districts under federal emergencies, judicial emergencies. we have 18 judges come out with no opposition on either side, and it wasn't a political issue. could not get one of them through congress. you know, when i talk to the graduating students, i just went through that season and had a chance to talk to many, many graduating law students, and i talked about those four words come and i said, you have read millions of board to get to today. you only h
. it is not one place. there is a unity of issues. ending inequality, making people pay their fair share of taxes, finding a way out of the student debt slavery, finding ways to keep people in their homes, stopping the evictions, making sure that those who got us into the economic mess, the bankers and wall street, be held accountable -- and getting money out of our politics. [applause] >> one place you want to occupy for sure is the white house. goldman sachs, these guys are continuing to run economic policy. it is goldman sachs. i am sorry. they're all goldman sachs alums. the bill back to goldman sachs. they go back into government. -- they all go back to goldman sachs. they go back into government. it is a white house issued. >> this goes back to the media in a way. i will go back to goldman sachs if i must. remember in august when there were about 1200 people doing civil disobedience around the white house protesting the keystone pipeline. the corporate mainstream media was like this on that. imagine if 1200 tea party members hitched themselves to the date of the white house. when occupy lau
is trying to not charge for this data. the way we did was with tax dollars. you already paid for it, we're trying to give it back to you. and, so, we take a wholesale retail. we want to be the providers of the data as a fuel, but fuel, gasoline is useless to get you from point a to point b unless you consume that ultimately drives value to the american economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities ha
. a larger cost on a smaller tax base, and, arguably, less affluent communities. man: sewickley township is a rural farming community, however, herminie itself would be considered to be the downtown area of the township. it's the agways, the auto-parts store, the bank. it's your typical small-town village. man: people think that rural areas are pristine and perfect and everybody has a nice, simple life. that's, uh, not exactly the situation here. when you come into town in the summer, you know you're coming to herminie. woman: the aroma in 90-degree days... can sometimes just want to knock you over. woman: we have water. we have power, we have gas, but we have no sewage. i guess when they laid out the town years ago, it just all went into the pipes and straight into the "crick." sabljak: i've lived here 43 years in the same house. when i moved here, they told us that sewage would be here shortly. and here it is 43 years later and we still don't have it. my husband and i went to the first meeting. he always said, "boy, i'll never see it in my lifetime." well... my husband passed away last
research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and th
more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but being the easy political solution. >> i think we're out of time. i would like to thank everyone on the panel for their time.. >> thank you kindly. as an ex-felon, it's not my first effort with a public defender in public for a bunch of people who i know are working hard to make this substance abuse incarceration cognitive behavior thing work all together. i started doing my career in rehabs and jails and shelters and where i live. it's a privilege to work for people who chose to be the audience. oddly enough, they don't get that in the
span. . >> many of our clients are working poor. they pay their taxes. they may run into a rough patch now and then and what we're able to provide is a bridge towards getting them back on their feet. the center averages about 14,000 visits a year in the health clinic alone. one of the areas that we specialize in is family medicine, but the additional focus of that is is to provide care to women and children. women find out they're pregnant, we talk to them about the importance of getting good prenatal care which takes many visits. we initially will see them for their full physical to determine their base line health, and then enroll them in prenatal care which occurs over the next 9 months. group prenatal care is designed to give women the opportunity to bond during their pregnancy with other women that have similar due dates. our doctors here are family doctors. they are able to help these women deliver their babies at the hospital, at general hospital. we also have the wic program, which is a program that provides food vouchers for our families after they have their children, up to a
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)

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